Dating fender bass

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The neck date simply refers to the date that the neck was produced.

Given the modular nature of Fender's production techniques, a neck may have been produced in one year, placed in a warehouse and remained in stock for a period of time, and then subsequently paired with a body to create a complete guitar in the following year.

Most notably, production dates have been penciled or stamped on the butt end of the heel of the neck of most guitars and basses.

While this neck dating is useful in roughly determining the age of a guitar, it is certainly not definitive.

The only way to try to narrow the date range of your specific instrument would be to remove the neck and check the butt end of the heel of the neck for a production date, which may be stamped or written there.

(If you are not comfortable performing this operation, please use an experienced professional guitar tech in your area or bring it to Superior Music).

Serial numbers have been used in various locations on Fender instruments through the years.

They have been placed at the top of the neck plate, on the front of the headstock, on the back of the headstock, and on the back of the neck near where the neck bolts onto the body.

The "S", stood for decade of the 1970s, and began CBS' attempt to use serial numbers to identify the year of production for the piece.They are detailed reference resources with a wealth of information for helping to either establish the vintage of your guitar or bass or for just learning more about Fender history in general.These books are the same resources we refer to here at Superior Music to research answers to history and dating questions.The following chart details the Fender serial number schemes used from 1950 to 1964.There is quite a bit of overlap of numbers and years.

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